A reading list on market power, superstar firms, and inequality

My best attempt at an overview of the corporate concentration issue, from a recent piece:

The basic facts are these: Most industries in the U.S. have grown more concentrated, meaning the largest firms account for a larger share of revenue. At the same time, corporate profits have reached all-time highs, despite lackluster rates of business investment. And the number of new businesses being founded has declined; the number of new growth startups being founded has risen, yet these firms struggle to scale. The cause of these trends is not clear. Theories include the rise of IT and the network effects it creates, less-rigorous antitrust enforcement, and lobbying and excess regulation.

And a reading list (I’ll try and update it, and let me know what I’ve missed):

The Pro Market blog at the Stigler Center has been excellent on this. Here are a few examples:

Economists: “Totality of Evidence” Underscores Concentration Problem in the U.S.

The Rise of Market Power and the Decline of Labor’s Share

Is the Digital Economy Much Less Competitive Than We Think It Is?

So has the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. 

Market power in the U.S. economy today

Is declining competition causing slow U.S. business investment growth?

U.S. antitrust and competition policy amid the new merger wave

A communications oligopoly on steroids: Why antitrust enforcement and regulatory oversight in digital communications matter

The New America Foundation’s Open Markets program is focused on this:

(update: New America and the Open Markets program have parted ways)

Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox

The Economist has done several great pieces:

The problem with profits

Too much of a good thing

A giant problem

The rise of the superstars

So has The Atlantic:

America’s Monopoly Problem

America’s Monopolies Are Holding Back the Economy

So has ProPublica:

The American Way

These Professors Make More Than a Thousand Bucks an Hour Peddling Mega-Mergers

This is a great piece from Fivethirtyeight on the state of startups:

The Next Amazon (Or Apple, Or GE) Is Probably Failing Right Now

Neil Irwin on winner-take-all at The Upshot:

The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy

Noah Smith at Bloomberg and on his blog:

Monopolies Are Worse Than We Thought

The Market Power Story

America’s Superstar Companies Are a Drag on Growth

Tyler Cowen on rising markups: “the whole story just doesn’t add up”:

The Rise of Market Power

Productivity and market power in general equilibrium

Intangible investment and monopoly profits

More on the rising markups paper (linked below):

Karl Smith

Robin Hanson

Arnold Kling

Litan and Hathaway on decline of new business formation:

Declining Business Dynamism in the United States: A Look at States and Metros

Jason Furman was involved in two papers on this topic:

A Firm-Level Perspective on the Role of Rents in the Rise in Inequality

BENEFITS OF COMPETITION AND INDICATORS OF MARKET POWER

Vox’s Matt Yglesias and Ezra Klein did a podcast on this:

The Weeds

Justin Fox on winner-take-all industries:

America’s Most Winner-Take-All Industry, Visualized

Greg Ip

A Provocative Look at the Harm From Corporate Heft

A few of the academic papers that are good starting points in my opinion:

Are U.S. Industries Becoming More Concentrated?

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S.

The Rise of Market Power and the Macroeconomic Implications

An interesting anonymous contribution, via Tyler Cowen

Large U.S. firms have always commanded monopolistic rents–think Dupont, Bethlehem Steel, IBM, GM/Ford/Chrysler in their respective heydays. However, several developments have worked to dramatically change how those rents are shared. Before the 1980s shareholder revolution, monopolistic rents of dominant firms were more broadly shared–not just with rank and file employees but with the local community. (link)

We’ve done tons at HBR on this…

…firms are failing faster:

The Biology of Corporate Survival

The Scary Truth About Corporate Survival

…on startups being started but not scaling:

The U.S. Startup Economy Is in Both Better and Worse Shape than We Thought

…on superstar firms, and the pay inequality that comes with them:

Productivity Is Soaring at Top Firms and Sluggish Everywhere Else

A Study of 16 Countries Shows That the Most Productive Firms (and Their Employees) Are Pulling Away from Everyone Else

Research: The Rise of Superstar Firms Has Been Better for Investors than for Employees

Corporate Inequality is the Defining Fact of Business Today

Corporations in the Age of Inequality

Investing in the IT That Makes a Competitive Difference

…on digital firms pulling ahead:

The Most Digital Companies Are Leaving All the Rest Behind

What the Companies on the Right Side of the Digital Business Divide Have in Common

Managing Our Hub Economy

(see also several of the items in the superstar section above)

…an interview with Jason Furman:

Competition Is on the Decline, and That’s Fueling Inequality

…on mergers:

Mergers May Be Profitable, but Are They Good for the Economy?

…on data, AI, and antitrust:

How Pricing Bots Could Form Cartels and Make Things More Expensive

Should Antitrust Regulators Stop Companies from Collecting So Much Data?

…on lobbying and rent-seeking:

Lobbyists Are Behind the Rise in Corporate Profits

…on common ownership:

One Big Reason There’s So Little Competition Among U.S. Banks

Warren Buffett Is Betting the Airline Oligopoly Is Here to Stay

…on big companies paying more than small ones, but less so than they used to:

Big Companies Don’t Pay As Well As They Used To

…and trying to sum it all up:

Making Sense of Our Very Competitive, Super Monopolistic Economy